Inside Spencer: The KSRL Blog

New Finding Aids Available: Part II

April 4th, 2017

Finding aids are documents created by a repository’s staff members as a point of access for an archival or manuscript collection. To understand more about how finding aids helps researchers navigate collections of manuscripts, organizational records, personal papers, letters, diaries, and photographs, check out our Finding Aids 101 blog post. Here’s a list of some of Kenneth Spencer Research Library’s newest finding aids, so see which collections interest you!

A photograph of members belonging to the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at a banquet from the Dorothy McField collection of sorority and fraternity papers. African American Experience Collection, Spencer Research Library.

A photograph of members belonging to the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity at a banquet
from the Dorothy McField collection of sorority and fraternity papers.
African American Experience Collection. Call number: RH MS P944.3. Click image to enlarge.

The first page of a listing of titles for Éigse Eireann ["Poetry Ireland"] from the Catholic Bulletin collection. Special Collections.

The first page of a listing of titles for Éigse Eireann [“Poetry Ireland”]
from the Catholic Bulletin collection. Special Collections.
Call number: MS 329 Box 2 Folder 45. Click image to enlarge.

A photograph of two cowboys on horseback from the Wallace, Kansas photographs collection. Kansas Collection.

A photograph of two cowboys on horseback from the Wallace, Kansas photographs collection.
Kansas Collection. Call number: RH PH 60 Folder 1. Click image to enlarge.

The title page from Eugène Farcot’s Literary Manuscript Un Voyage Aérien; Dans Cinquante Ans. Special Collections.

The title page from Eugène Farcot’s Literary Manuscript Un Voyage Aérien; Dans Cinquante Ans.
Special Collections. Call number: MS K32. Click image to enlarge.

May 7th and 8th from the five year Diary of Maude Egbert, note her entry on May 8, 1945 or Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day). Kansas Collection.

May 7th and 8th from the five year Diary of Maude Egbert, note her entry on May 8, 1945
or Victory in Europe Day (V-E Day). Kansas Collection.
Call number: RH MS B77. Click image to enlarge.

Other new finding aids:

Mindy Babarskis
Reference Specialist
Public Services

President Eisenhower: Abilene’s Greatest Son

February 20th, 2017

Abilene, Kansas is a small city of under 7,000 people, but it managed to produce one of the most influential U.S. presidents. The only president to come from Kansas, Dwight D. Eisenhower served 8 years in the office from 1953-1961. Here he worked ceaselessly to deescalate the cold war and poured his energies into working towards world peace. But before he became the 34th President of the United States, Eisenhower served as the commanding general of the U.S. troops in Europe during World War II. After Victory in Europe Day on May 8, 1945, then General Eisenhower returned to his hometown of Abilene. Here at the Spencer Research Library, as a part of our Kansas Collection, we have General Eisenhower’s Homecoming train brochure signed by the man himself and the Abilene Reflector-Chronicle issue reporting on his historic return. If you’re interested in learning more about our nation’s only president from Kansas, check out this great entry in the Kansas Historical Soceity’s Kansapedia, book a trip to the Dwight D. Eisenhower Presidential Library, Museum and Boyhood Home, or come visit us here at Spencer Research Library!

Eisenhower homecoming train brochure and menu front cover, signed by Dwight D. Eishehower. Kansas Collection, call number: RH MS 1345 Box 9 Folder 35.
Eisenhower homecoming train brochure and menu front cover, signed by Dwight D. Eisehower.
Papers of Harry Darby, Kansas Collection, call number: RH MS 1345 Box 9 Folder 35. Click image to enlarge.

General Eisenhower homecoming train seating chart and menu, call number: RH MS 1345 Box 9 Folder 35.
General Eisenhower homecoming train seating chart and menu, Papers of Harry Darby, Kansas Collection,
call number: RH MS 1345 Box 9 Folder 35. Click image to enlarge.

"Abilene's Greatest Son Comes Home", Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page, June 22, 1945, Spencer Research Library.

“Abilene’s Greatest Son Comes Home”, Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page
from June 22, 1945. Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319. Click image to enlarge.

"Ike is at Home", Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page from June 22, 1945. Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319.   Continuation of "Ike is at Home", Abilene Reflector-Chronicle page 6 from June 22, 1945. Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319.
Article discussing General Eisenhower’s arrival by train titled “Ike is at Home”,
Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page and page 6 from June 22, 1945.
Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319. Click images to enlarge.

"Eisenhower Calls Friends to Realize Responsibility in United Effort for Peace", Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page from June 22, 1945. Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319.

Article describing the speech given by General Eisenhower to Abilene residents titled “Eisenhower Calls Friends to Realize Responsibility in United Effort for Peace”, Abilene Reflector-Chronicle front page from June 22, 1945.
Kansas Collection, call number: RH H319. Click image to enlarge.

Mindy Babarskis
Reference Specialist
Public Services

Have a Dreadful Halloween!

October 31st, 2016

Here are some spooky penny dreadfuls from our Special Collections to help you get into the Halloween spirit! Come into Spencer Research Library and take a look at the rest of our sensational tales from Victorian England.

First page of the penny dreadful titled The Old Witchcrafts by Robert and William Chambers probably published in 1854 in London and Edinburgh. Special Collections, B1229.

First page of the penny dreadful titled
The Old Witchcrafts, with illustration.
Written and published by Robert and
William Chambers, London and Edinburgh, circa 1854.
Call number: B1229. Click image to enlarge.

First page of the penny dreadful titled The Vampire, or, the Bride of the Isles. Published by G. Purkess circa 1853. Special Collections, B1239

First page of the penny dreadful titled
The Vampire, or, the Bride of the Isles,
with illustration. Published in London by
G. Purkess, circa 1853.
Call number: B1239. Click image to enlarge.

First page of the penny dreadful titled The haunted forest, or, The demon raftsman. Published in London by G. Purkess circa1853. Special Collections, B1251.

First page of the penny dreadful titled
The Haunted Forest, or, the Demon Raftsman,
with illustration. Published in London by
G. Purkess, circa 1853.
Call number: B1251. Click image to enlarge.

Mindy Babarskis
Reference Specialist
Public Services

Happy 150th Birthday, Beatrix Potter!

July 29th, 2016

In celebration of the 150th birthday of the beloved children’s author and illustrator, Beatrix Potter, I am featuring a few examples of her beautiful work found in our Special Collections here at Spencer Research Library. Please enjoy the selections below along with a short biography introducing you to one of the most influential figures in children’s literature from the twentieth century.

Beatrix Potter was born on July 28, 1866 in London, England. Although she was a lonely child, she was able to find joy in drawing and painting things from the natural world, recording the plants and animals of the English countryside in stunning detail. As an adult she continued to illustrate, even drawing in the margins of letters sent to the children of her former governess, Annie Moore. Her first book, The Tale of Peter Rabbit came about from the drawings on one of these very letters from September 4, 1893!

Front cover of Beatrix Potter’s "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" published in Philadelphia by H. Altemus in 1904.Pages 34-35 ofFront cover of Beatrix Potter’s "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" published in Philadelphia by H. Altemus in 1904.

Front cover and pages 34-35 of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Peter Rabbit published in Philadelphia
by H. Altemus in 1904. Special Collections. Call Number: Children 5159. Click images to enlarge.

After partnering with the publishers of Frederick Warne & Co., twenty-two ‘little books’ with lovely color illustrations were produced. Some of these stories even featured her own pets, like the hedgehog Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle.

Front cover of Beatrix Potter’s The tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle published in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1905.

Front cover of Beatrix Potter’s The tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle published
in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1905. Special Collections.
Call Number: Children 2972. Click image to enlarge.

Because of her skill with writing exciting stories, painting detailed and colorful pictures, and using clear language, Potter’s works quickly became children’s classics.

Pages 52 & 53 of Beatrix Potter’s The Roly-Poly Pudding published in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1908.

Here is an excellent example of Potter’s ability to capture humor and action in both the text
and accompanying illustration from pages 52 & 53 of Beatrix Potter’s The Roly-Poly Pudding
published in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1908. Special Collections.
Call Number: Children C606. Click image to enlarge.

She eventually married William Heelis, a solicitor, in 1913 and retired to her farm, Hill Top, to become a prize-winning breeder of Herdwick sheep and a champion for local land conservation. After her death on December 22, 1943 she left 15 farms, several cottages, and over 4,000 acres of land to her husband and on his death to the National Trust, a conservation organization for the United Kingdom.

Page 56 of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher published in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1906.

Potter’s fascination with nature is evident in the loving detail of both plants and animals
found in this example from page 56 of Beatrix Potter’s The Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher published
in New York by Frederick Warne & Co. in 1906. Call Number: Children 2983. Click image to enlarge.

To learn more about Beatrix Potter and view her delightful books, come visit us at Spencer Research Library and check out a few of these items:

  • Peter Rabbit & other tales : Art from the world of Beatrix Potter. New York: New York University, [c1977]. Shelved at Spencer Research Library. Call Number: C18290.
  • Potter, Beatrix. Beatrix Potter’s letters. London: Warne, 1989. Shelved at Watson Library. Call Number: O72 Z48 1989.
  • Potter, Beatrix. Transcribed from her code writing by Leslie Linder. The journal of Beatrix Potter, 1881-1897. London; New York: F. Warne, 1989. Shelved at Watson Library. Call Number: O72 Z52 1989.
  • Potter, Beatrix. The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin. New York: Frederick Warne, [c1903]. Shelved at Spencer Research Library. Call Number: Children A78.

Mindy Babarskis
Reference Specialist
Public Services

Happy Birthday, Frank Lloyd Wright!

June 6th, 2016

To celebrate architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s 149th birthday on June 8th, I’m highlighting a few photos from the Wright Collection. This collection deals specifically with Frank Lloyd Wright and his buildings, but we have a number of other architecture items in our Special Collections. Come visit us anytime this summer from 9-5 pm on weekdays and explore these amazing collections yourself!

Photograph of Olgivanna and Frank Lloyd Wright.

Photograph of Olgivanna and Frank Lloyd Wright.
Special Collections, Spencer Research Library.
Call Number: Wright P:III:4:67. Click image to enlarge.

Photograph by Maynard L. Parker of the Juvenile Cultural Study Center (Also known as the Harry F. Corbin Education Center) in Wichita, Kansas by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1957.

Photograph of the Juvenile Cultural Study Center (Also known as the Harry F. Corbin Education Center)
in Wichita, Kansas by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1957. Special Collections, Spencer Research Library.
Call Number: Wright P:I:7:3. Click image to enlarge.

  Color print of the Bott residence in Kansas City, Missouri by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1956.

Color print of the Bott residence in Kansas City, Missouri by architect Frank Lloyd Wright, 1956.
Special Collections, Spencer Research Library. Call Number: Wright P:I:49:1. Click image to enlarge.

Mindy Babarskis
Reference Specialist
Public Services